This website uses cookies that are necessary for the operation of the website. If you agree, we also set a cookie, which is used for anonymous statistical purposes. This helps us to design our website better and to offer exactly the content that you are looking for.
Details

Necessary cookies help to make a website usable by enabling basic functions such as page navigation and access to secure areas of the website. The website may not function properly without these cookies.

NameProviderPurposeExpiry
modxcmssession technik-museum.de The cookie is required for secure login and detection of spam or website abuse. Session
PHPSESSID technik-museum.de The cookie is required for secure login and detection of spam or website abuse. Session
frontend technik-museum.de Necessary for the assignment and storage of the shopping cart in the shop. Session
frontend_cid technik-museum.de Necessary for the assignment and storage of the shopping cart in the shop. Session
external_no_cache technik-museum.de Technically necessary cookie for the performance of the website. Session
cmnstr technik-museum.de Saves the consent status of the user for cookies. 1 year
external_no_cache technik-museum.de A cookie that indicates if caching is disabled in shop. Session
store technik-museum.de Saves choosen store language Session

Statistics cookies help website owners understand how visitors interact with Web pages by collecting and reporting information anonymously.

NameProviderPurposeExpiry
_ga Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data about how the visitor uses the site. 2 years
_gat Google Used by Google Analytics to limit the request rate. 1 day
_gid Google Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data about how the visitor uses the site. 1 day
1P_JAR Google Cookie for remarketing. 1 month
ANID Google Cookie for remarketing. 1 year
CONSENT Google Cookie for remarketing. 17 years
IDE Doubleclick.net Cookie for remarketing. 1 year
NID Google Cookie for remarketing. 6 months

Flute-playing instruments and clocks

The first devices that, in a wide sense, can be considered automatic musical instruments were the musical movements built into clocks. Initially, they were chimes or psaltery-related harp clocks. But because of their limited range of sound these instruments could only play very simple melodies. In the 18th century, seinettes, also referred to as “bird organs”, became quite popular. Amongst other things they were used to teach canaries to sing. An example from the Museum Wilhelmsbau is shown in the picture. 

Serinettes are already equipped with all parts which make up an automatic musical instrument: a drive (hand crank), a sound carrier (pinned barrel), and sound cources (pipes). The hand crank drives both the barrel and the pump. The pinned barrel is sensed by small levers which are attached to valves. If a lever is raised by a pin, the valve opens and compressed air streams into the corresponding pipe.

Refinement of this principle finally led to the development of flute-playing clocks which were driven by weights and had a clockwork with additional flute pipes. Reproduction of melodies was more and more perfected by improving the pinned barrels and had a clockwork with additional flute pipes. Reproduction of melodies was more and more perfected by improving the pinned barrels and the sensing mechanism. Even famous composers like Mozart, Haydn, Händel or Beethoven wrote music especially for flute-playing clocks. The most valuable masterpieces could be found in the castles of emperors and kings. Frederick the Great and Napoleon both were enthusiastic collectors of flute-playing clocks. This early from of automatic musical instruments is also represented in the Wilhelmsbau. The picture on the opposite page shows the “Clock Cabinet” where many valuable originals are on display.